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Television use in early childhood and academic achievement in eighth grade: Examining the moderating effects of parental involvement and program content THESIS

, Georgetown University, United States

Georgetown University . Awarded

Abstract

This study investigates the relationship between child-directed television program viewing at a young age and academic achievement later in life as well the moderating role that parents may play in this relationship. The Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS-K) was used to gather information about the amount and types of television children watched the year before kindergarten and in first grade, how involved parents were in their child's school and home life, as well as children's subsequent academic achievement in eighth grade. Analyses revealed that children who watched child-directed programming during early childhood did not have higher academic achievement during eighth grade. Results also indicated that parents moderated the relationship between television viewing habits and later academic achievement. Children who watched more television and had more involved parents had higher eighth grade academic achievement than children who watched less television and/or had less involved parents.

Citation

Richards, M.N. Television use in early childhood and academic achievement in eighth grade: Examining the moderating effects of parental involvement and program content. Master's thesis, Georgetown University. Retrieved December 11, 2017 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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