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The effects of captioned videotapes upon the acquisition of sight vocabulary
DISSERTATION

, Widener University, United States

Widener University . Awarded

Abstract

This study examined the effectiveness of captioned programming in building students' sight vocabulary. The research problem explored the following issue: whether learning disabled students reading below their expected developmental levels in reading could expand their sight vocabulary by viewing captioned videotapes in the context of a directed reading activity. The research hypothesis thus stated: Students whose reading achievement was more than two years below grade level would demonstrate improvements in sight vocabulary which were statistically greater than the improvements in sight vocabulary exhibited by students functioning only one to two years below grade level in reading.

The study was conducted with students (N = 29) ranging in age from seven to 21 years of age. Students were pretested on a vocabulary measure, the Thorndike-Lorge Vocabulary List. Posttest measures with the same test assessed sight vocabulary following the viewing of the captioned videotapes. A factorial ANOVA (groups x measures) was completed. The between-subjects factor was group membership—i.e., learning disabled students reading one to two years below their expected chronological age/grade levels and learning disabled students reading more than two years below their expected chronological age/grade levels. The within-subjects factor was time (pretest vs. posttest) with the treatment intervening. The word identification subtest of the Woodcock Reading Mastery Tests-Revised served as a covariate. Four videotaped segments of the television program Rescue 911 were used in the treatment procedure. Each videotape was shown seven times during a two week period.

Initial F ratios computed in this study were not statistically significant. Learning disabled students functioning only one to two years below grade level in reading did not produce posttest scores on the Thorndike-Lorge Vocabulary List which were statistically different from the posttest scores exhibited by learning disabled students whose reading achievement was more than two years below grade level.

A follow-up analysis was conducted in which students (N = 17) were grouped by reading levels only. One group (N = 8) included those reading at the first to third grade levels. The second group (N = 9) included those reading at the sixth to eleventh grade levels. Nine students reading at the fourth to fifth grade levels were excluded, thereby eliminating median values. A second factorial ANOVA (levels x measures) was then computed.

There were no significant pretest vs. posttest differences on the Thorndike-Lorge Vocabulary List for the group reading at the sixth to eleventh grade levels. There were significant differences (p < .001) for those reading at the primary grade levels (grades one to three). These findings imply that multisensory presentations are beneficial. to disabled readers when aimed at the proximal zone of development, but not when developmental indicators of reading ability are used to group students.

Citation

Hoffner, H. The effects of captioned videotapes upon the acquisition of sight vocabulary. Ph.D. thesis, Widener University. Retrieved February 20, 2020 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

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