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Assessing in-kind Middle School teachers' concern about & use of SOARS: School Online Assessment Reporting System
DISSERTATION

, Pepperdine University, United States

Pepperdine University . Awarded

Abstract

In recent years technology has been integrated into every sector of education. Using Student Online Assessment Reporting System (SOARS) to assess score results and design instructional strategies for improved learning is a challenge and will cause concern to teachers.

This is a descriptive comparative study designed to measure select Middle School teachers’ Stages of Concern and Levels of Use regarding the SOARS assessment tool. SOARS was adopted by Jeffco Public Schools (CO) to chart student progress by presenting Colorado Student Assessment Program (CSAP) score data. This study determined if there was a significant difference between the Stages of Concern and Levels of Use of High Profile and Low Profile Middle School teachers.

High Profile Middle Schools have demographic data that show the highest percentile levels of free/reduced lunches, ethnicity rates, and mobility rates and Low Profile Middle Schools have the lowest percentile levels.

This study targeted a select group (N=72) of core-subject teachers (Language Arts, Math, and Science) from High and Low Profile Middle Schools. There were three High Profile Middle Schools and three Low Profile Middle Schools that participated in this study.

When comparing results of this research, data show there are no significant differences between the two groups of High and Low Profile Middle Schools’ teachers regarding their Stages of Concern and Levels of Use of SOARS. Both High and Low Profile Middle School teachers benefit from an equal level of teacher preparation, support, and commitment by all.

Citation

Marion, J.M. Assessing in-kind Middle School teachers' concern about & use of SOARS: School Online Assessment Reporting System. Ph.D. thesis, Pepperdine University. Retrieved February 26, 2020 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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