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The Squares Family: A Game and Story based Microworld for Understanding Arithmetic Concepts designed to attract girls. PROCEEDINGS

, University of Trollhättan/Uddevalla, Sweden

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Lugano, Switzerland ISBN 978-1-880094-53-2 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

To address the matter of children's lacking understanding of arithmetic concepts, we have designed an educational environment, a microworld, which we believe stimulate self-regulation and reflective cognition. The microworld is based on an analogical, constructive representation, where mathematical objects and operations are translated into graphical objects and animations. The microworld contains a story, and combined card- and board games. The story is about the Squares Family. It has three purposes: to explain the graphical model; to introduce the games; and to give an understanding of the concepts involved. The purpose of the games is to allow children to use the graphical model and to practice important aspects of arithmetic. The games focus on concepts, not computations, and encourage own discoveries. The combination of a story-based microworld with games shows potential for providing an effective learning environment. The microworld is developed with user-centred design, and there is a prototype in Java.

Citation

Pareto, L. (2004). The Squares Family: A Game and Story based Microworld for Understanding Arithmetic Concepts designed to attract girls. In L. Cantoni & C. McLoughlin (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2004--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 1567-1574). Lugano, Switzerland: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 19, 2018 from .

Keywords

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Cited By

  1. Development Methods for a Social Conversational Agent in a Virtual Learning Environment with an Educational Math Game

    Annika Silvervarg, Linköping University, Sweden

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2010 (Jun 29, 2010) pp. 1218–1223

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