You are here:

Technology transfer via university-industry relationship: The case of the foreign high-technology electronic industry in Mexico's Silicon Valley
DISSERTATION

, State University of New York at Buffalo, United States

State University of New York at Buffalo . Awarded

Abstract

Mexico's new strategy of industrialization has been targeting foreign direct investment (FDI) primarily in the microelectronic industry via friendly policies and tax exemption, expecting to obtain technology. The purpose of the present study is to explore the extent to which technology transfer and assimilation is occurring as a result of FDI operations in Guadalajara.

Using a quantitative as well as a qualitative approach, this study interviews ninety-two people from the academic, corporate and governmental settings. The analysis is based on three survey questionnaires, two instruments for interviewing, and scheduled and non-scheduled standardized interviews.

This study found that after more than fifteen years of operation under the new policy for FDI, which consists of holiday taxes and incentives, there has been very limited technology transfer occurring in Guadalajara. In addition, the analysis of the level of the technology transferred indicates that most of the technology is concentrated in the absorption of operative capabilities. The findings of this study contrast enormously with the technology transfer that some studies report have occurred in some Asian countries. As this study demonstrates, the level of scientific and technological activities in Mexico's Silicon Valley is high and there is no indication of lack of absorptive capacity as an obstacle for technology transfer and assimilation. The difference in the technology transferred to these two distant regions is even more striking when the level of absorptive capacity in Mexico's Silicon Valley is compared to at least one of the Asian countries where technology transfer occurred. In the Silicon Valley of the East the technology transferred during the 1970's and 1980's with respect to the training of suppliers and at the level of investment capability is evidently superior to that recorded by this study in Mexico's Silicon Valley at the close of the 1990's. Lastly, this study found that the most important links for international transfer of technology such as research, publications, and patents are missing in the university-industry relationship examined.

Citation

Rivera Vargas, M.I. Technology transfer via university-industry relationship: The case of the foreign high-technology electronic industry in Mexico's Silicon Valley. Ph.D. thesis, State University of New York at Buffalo. Retrieved September 26, 2020 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

For copies of dissertations and theses: (800) 521-0600/(734) 761-4700 or https://dissexpress.umi.com

Keywords