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Communication Design for Online Courses: Effects of a Multi-Layer Approach
PROCEEDINGS

, University of Nevada, Reno, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Phoenix, Arizona, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-50-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

The first part of this paper will introduce the four phases of online course communication design – analysis, design, implementation, and evaluation. The second part of the paper will present a study that examines (a) the impact of different approaches of online communication design (single-layer, and multi-layer design) on student perceptions about online courses in terms of their enjoyment, motivation and level of anxiety towards online learning, (b) the effectiveness of different communication format on student learning in terms of the completion of communication tasks, and (c) student satisfaction level to the use of each communication format. The participants of the study are 286 students who have been enrolled in online courses. Multivariate analysis was performed for the data analysis. Differences were found in each of the three areas. A series of results and findings will be detailed in the paper and presentation.

Citation

Liu, L. (2003). Communication Design for Online Courses: Effects of a Multi-Layer Approach. In A. Rossett (Ed.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2003--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 1699-1700). Phoenix, Arizona, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 18, 2019 from .

Keywords

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References

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Cited By

  1. Creating Interactive Video for Counseling Skill Training

    Leping Liu, Cleborne Maddux, Paul Abney & Kulwadee Kongrith, University of Nevada, Reno, United States

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2004 (2004) pp. 1863–1868

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