You are here:

A comparative study of three instructional modalities in a computer programming course: Traditional instruction, Web-based instruction, and online instruction
DISSERTATION

, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, United States

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro . Awarded

Abstract

This study is a quasi-experimental design to examine students' performance in integrating the web in different aspects of teaching and learning in an introductory programming course. This course is an introduction to problem-solving methods and algorithm development using a higher-level programming language (C++). This empirical, exploratory study examined the academic performance, motivation, satisfaction and course completion rate of students using three instructional modalities: (1) traditional face-to-face, (2) web-assisted, and (3) online. Participants were primarily entering first year college students attending an Historically Black College and University (HBCU) majoring in computer science. Data collected included scores on the departmental computer placement test, the proficiency examination, two multiple-choice examinations, three programming assignments, the Intrinsic Motivation Inventory (IMI), the course evaluation form, and the Motivated Strategies Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ).

This study supports the body of research studies that have concluded that online instruction is as effective as traditional face-to-face instruction. This study revealed that the instructional modality did not affect student motivation, self-regulation completion rate, and academic performance on the end of semester proficiency examination. However, in this study face-to-face, web-assisted, and online instructional modalities were equally effective for teaching computer programming.

Citation

Caldwell, E.R. A comparative study of three instructional modalities in a computer programming course: Traditional instruction, Web-based instruction, and online instruction. Ph.D. thesis, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Retrieved October 15, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

For copies of dissertations and theses: (800) 521-0600/(734) 761-4700 or https://dissexpress.umi.com

Keywords