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Integrating multimedia in technology education to improve college student comprehension, problem-solving skills, and attitudes toward instructional effectiveness
DISSERTATION

, North Carolina State University, United States

North Carolina State University . Awarded

Abstract

To determine the effects of a multimedia lecture on selected technology education students' comprehension, performance, and attitudes toward instructional effectiveness, the researcher used a variation of the nonequivalent control group design. The experimentally accessible population for this study was undergraduate students enrolled in technology education classes at North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina. The sample was two sections of the same technology education course covering jigs and fixtures, materials, manufacturing and tool skills.

The comparison group received instruction using a traditional PowerPoint text-only lecture on jigs and fixtures. The experimental group received instruction using a PowerPoint lecture, with the same content, but enhanced with images, sound, and movies. Both groups received instruction for 1 week. The pre-test and Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ) scores were used as covariates to adjust for initial differences between the groups. An analysis of covariance showed significant differences among the dependent variables for the teaching methods studied.

Follow-up analysis revealed the following findings: (a) no significant difference in student achievement between the treatment groups, as measured by scores on a post-test given at the end of the instructional unit; (b) a significant difference in performance time between the treatment groups, as measured by a performance exercise; (c) a significant difference in performance accuracy between the treatment groups, as measured by a performance exercise; and (d) no significant difference in students' overall attitudes toward instructional effectiveness, as measured by the attitude survey. The study's results provided no evidence that multimedia-enhanced lectures are more or less effective than are traditional teaching methods with regard to student comprehension. Multimedia may be an important tool for teaching performance when students have limited experience or background in materials, methods, and procedures. Moreover, multimedia is not found more effective in improving student perception of instructional effectiveness.

Citation

Sanders, C.S. Integrating multimedia in technology education to improve college student comprehension, problem-solving skills, and attitudes toward instructional effectiveness. Ph.D. thesis, North Carolina State University. Retrieved October 23, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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