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Interactive dialogues in language software to develop speaking fluency: A study of preservice English teachers in Korea
DISSERTATION

, Teachers College, Columbia University, United States

Teachers College, Columbia University . Awarded

Abstract

The current government in Korea, in order to encourage more fluent use of English, has shifted the focus of the English curriculum from language accuracy to language fluency by encouraging English teachers to use English as a classroom language. However, many English teachers in Korea feel burdened by this policy, mainly because they themselves lack speaking fluency as teachers. The current government in Korea, in order to encourage more fluent use of English, has shifted the focus of the English curriculum from language accuracy to language fluency by encouraging English teachers to use English as a classroom language. However, many English teachers in Korea feel burdened by this policy, mainly because they themselves lack speaking fluency as teachers.

Technology is considered to be useful for language learning, but it is not clear what software might be helpful. In the context of learning theories related to the use of technology, particularly the cognitive load theory, this study examined specific features in language software that might be helpful for speaking fluency.

The study investigated what interactive features pre-service English teachers in Korea identified as helpful in using language software, TELL ME MORE by comparing a closed-ended and an open-ended interactive dialogue version of the program. Additionally, the study examined the difference in language learning as measured by a speaking test. The open-ended interactive dialogue lessons required participants to create words or respond to adaptive feedback, providing a learning environment similar to real life context. Finally, the study examined how language learners perceived the most and the least helpful features in using language software, when exposed to different interactive dialogue lessons.

The study found that the students who experienced the open-ended dialogue version of the software considered the open-ended interactive dialogue features as helpful to improve speaking fluency. The students in the open-ended dialogue group also had a higher mean score on the speaking test, when compared to the closed-ended interactive dialogue lesson group that simply chose answers from the examples or responded to fixed feedback. In the interviews, a subset of the open-ended software group students discussed the difficulty – and the helpfulness–of continuing a conversation in open-ended interactive dialogue lessons.

This study provides new insight for educational administrators in Korea regarding the role of multimedia environments based on the knowledge of interactive multimedia for language learning. The study shows that English teachers in Korea may achieve deeper understanding with the use of open-ended interactive dialogue lessons in language software.

Citation

Son, J. Interactive dialogues in language software to develop speaking fluency: A study of preservice English teachers in Korea. Ph.D. thesis, Teachers College, Columbia University. Retrieved April 12, 2021 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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