You are here:

Elementary school computer access, socioeconomic status, ethnicity, and grade 5 student achievement
DISSERTATION

EdD, Sam Houston State University . Awarded

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the current school computer access rates of elementary school students and to determine the extent to which school computer access relates to academic achievement among Grade 5 students in the state of Texas. Specifically, the relationship of school computer access to student passing rates on the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) for all Grade 5 students as well as for Black, Hispanic, and White students in the areas of reading, math, and science was analyzed for two school years (i.e., 2009-2010 and 2010-2011). In addition, the relationship of school computer access to Grade 5 student passing rates on the TAKS Reading, Math, and Science tests with respect to school poverty level were examined for the same period of two years.

Methodology: A causal-comparative research design was used in this investigation. Computer access was examined for Texas elementary schools in general and as a function of school poverty level, majority ethnicity, and accountability rating. School computer access was also used to compare student groups (i.e., All, Black, Hispanic, and White) and school groups (i.e., high/low percent economically disadvantaged) with respect to Grade 5 TAKS Reading, Math, and Science passing rates. School computer access was based on number of students per computer as reported to the TEA by school principals through the STaR Chart survey in 2009-2010 and 2010-2011. The AEIS database yielded school data on student groups, school groups, and student passing rates on the Grade 5 TAKS Reading, Math, and Science tests for both years.

Findings: Disparities in school computer access were noted among Texas elementary schools disaggregated by poverty level, majority ethnic population, and state accountability rating. Levels of school computer access, however, were not statistically significantly related to Grade 5 TAKS Reading, Math, or Science passing rates for Black, Hispanic, or White students. In addition, levels of school computer access were not statistically significantly related to Grade 5 TAKS Reading, Math, or Science passing rates for schools as a function of poverty level. School computer access alone did not result in improved levels of student achievement.

KEY WORDS: Achievement, Digital Divide, Information and Communication Technology, Ethnicity, Technology access, Equity, Student to computer ratio, Social capital.

Citation

. Elementary school computer access, socioeconomic status, ethnicity, and grade 5 student achievement. EdD thesis, Sam Houston State University. Retrieved May 24, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

For copies of dissertations and theses: (800) 521-0600/(734) 761-4700 or https://dissexpress.umi.com

Keywords