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Teacher perceptions of e-mail as a method of communication with parents
DISSERTATION

, University of Virginia, United States

University of Virginia . Awarded

Abstract

Despite the growing presence of e-mail in society, few teachers are using e-mail to communicate with parents. This study sought to determine teacher perceptions of e-mail as a method of communication with parents. Specifically, the study sought to answer the following research questions: (1) What are teachers' perceptions of e-mail as a method of professional communication with parents? (2) What are the relationships between selected personal variables and teacher perceptions of e-mail as a method of professional communication with parents? (3) What do teachers believe are the greatest obstacles to using e-mail as a method of professional communication with parents? A quantitative survey was designed. Surveys were sent to all elementary school teachers in a southeastern school district. Overall study findings showed that teachers were in favor of e-mail as a method of communication with parents, yet only 21% described their e-mail use with parents as “frequent.” Teachers felt that e-mail was not an appropriate method for discussing negative topics with parents, but agreed that it was convenient. Teachers who had administrators who modeled e-mail use with parents were more likely to have positive feelings about e-mail use. Lack of parent accessibility and lack of teacher time were seen as the two greatest obstacles to using e-mail with parents. Findings from this study suggest that teachers may feel more comfortable using e-mail if guided by e-mail-use policies and if given additional time to use it. Findings also encourage school communities to investigate parent accessibility to e-mail and ways to provide universal e-mail access to parents.

Citation

Dorgan, E.H. Teacher perceptions of e-mail as a method of communication with parents. Ph.D. thesis, University of Virginia. Retrieved October 19, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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