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A comparison of traditional, videoconference-based, and Web-based learning environments
DISSERTATION

, Texas A&M University - Kingsville, United States

Texas A&M University - Kingsville . Awarded

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to gain a comprehensive understanding of the experiences of graduate students and faculty members at on-campus and remote sites in courses delivered using Web-based course management courseware and videoconference-based (TTVN) delivery methods. The study examined the differences among distance learning and traditional learning environments. Several factors were compared to determine the differences: student satisfaction, peer relationships, faculty motivation, faculty load, and resource support.

The study applied a mixed-methods design, using both quantitative and qualitative methods, both descriptive and comparative in design. A questionnaire instrument was used to collect data concerning the differences among the three different learning environments from the students' perspectives. The sample for the study was 311 Texas A&M University System students who took distance learning courses. The participants of the qualitative study consisted of seven faculty members and six administrators from the Texas A&M University System. Qualitative interviews and observations were conducted to identify factors that contribute to the differences among the three different learning environments from the faculty members' perspectives.

Findings from the study indicate that student satisfaction and peer relationships are significantly related to the learning environments. Faculty members have different motivations and workloads in different learning environments and feel that the tenure/promotion standard is not well defined and only universal standards apply for all faculty members. There is still no standard to evaluate the effectiveness of distance learning educators.

Citation

Kuo, M.M. A comparison of traditional, videoconference-based, and Web-based learning environments. Ph.D. thesis, Texas A&M University - Kingsville. Retrieved December 13, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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