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An examination of timing and structure of online interaction and undergraduate students' quality of *discussion, motivations and *attitudes
DISSERTATION

, Texas Tech University, United States

Doctor of Education, Texas Tech University . Awarded

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of the timing of interaction (synchronous or asynchronous) and structure of interaction (non-structured vs. moderated) provided by on-line resources, tools, and activities on students' quality of discussion, attitudes, and motivations in an online course. Problems arose as how to decide the significance of the three factors: timing of interaction, structure of interaction, timing and structure of interaction that impact students' quality of discussion, motivations, and attitudes.

Participation was voluntary and participants were asked to take a motivation and attitude survey. The data of covariates from the field notes and quality of discussion tests after instruction were collected by the instructors and the researchers.

The quality of the discussion was analyzed according to qualitative analysis. The byproduct of this online discussion gave the index of students' motivations and attitudes. The Component Factor and MANOVA analyzing results show that there is a significant mean difference in undergraduate students' attitudes as measured by a post treatment survey in relation to timing and structure of interaction.

Citation

Chen, K.T. An examination of timing and structure of online interaction and undergraduate students' quality of *discussion, motivations and *attitudes. Doctor of Education thesis, Texas Tech University. Retrieved January 29, 2020 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 22, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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