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A comparison of the academic intrinsic motivation of gifted and non-gifted fifth graders taught using computer simulations and traditional teaching methods
DISSERTATION

, University of North Texas, United States

Doctor of Education, University of North Texas . Awarded

Abstract

This study investigated the use of interdisciplinary computer-based simulations compared to traditional teaching methods. The academic intrinsic motivation of gifted and non-gifted students was analyzed using a quasi-experimental design, similar to a pretest /posttest design.

Students selected for this study were from a large suburban school district in north Texas. The students were from two in-tact groups of fifth grades at two different elementary schools. There were a total of 183 subjects in the study.

The experimental group was taught using two multi-disciplinary computer simulations as part of a twelve week unit of study. These simulations include reading, math, science, and social studies content, and require approximately twenty-five hours to complete. The control group was taught the same content using traditional teaching methods.

Pretest and posttest scores on the Children's Academic Intrinsic Motivation Inventory were used for analysis. This measurement tool includes subscales for general orientation toward schooling, reading, math, science, and social studies.

Analysis of the data revealed no statistical differences and negligible effect sizes in general orientation toward schooling, reading , math, science, and social studies for both gifted and non-gifted students.

It is recommended that further studies be conducted to investigate the use of computer simulations over a longer period of time, and at other grade levels. It is also recommended that other dependent variables be investigated.

Citation

Dittrich, C.E. A comparison of the academic intrinsic motivation of gifted and non-gifted fifth graders taught using computer simulations and traditional teaching methods. Doctor of Education thesis, University of North Texas. Retrieved June 18, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 22, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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