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Connectivism: The (in)formal cohort and its’ implications in knowledge construction
PROCEEDINGS

, Columbia University Teachers College, United States ; , New York University, United States ; , Barnard College, Columbia University, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Las Vegas, NV, USA ISBN 978-1-939797-05-6 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

Connectivism: The (in)formal cohort and its implications in knowledge construction

This paper examines connectivism within both the digital technology infrastructure used and the question of whether or not we are offloading the process of meaning-making. Connectivism may be further extended as the distribution of knowledge outside of the learner. We conclude with implications that call for further research, as there is a growing movement which reflects the increasing social application of these learning environments. Connectivism is a constructivist-based social learning theory where the learner and their connections to their ideas and others becomes central to the educational experience. Whereas Communities of Practice (Wenger, 2006) deconstructed how members develop knowledge through social practice, mentorship, and skill acquisition, connectivism (Siemens, 2004) is defined by the creation and visualization of ideas that are constructed and further shared and manipulated with

Citation

Murdoch, D., Socolick, F. & Murdoch, J. (2013). Connectivism: The (in)formal cohort and its’ implications in knowledge construction. In T. Bastiaens & G. Marks (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2013--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 1559-1565). Las Vegas, NV, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved January 17, 2021 from .

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