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Portals and Platforms: Does the technology matter when developing an online community?
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, Curtin University, Australia ; , Murdoch University, Australia ; , University of Western Australia, Australia

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Victoria, Canada ISBN 978-1-939797-03-2 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

Many education providers grapple with “where” to host their online education community. While many have invested significant funding and time into developing a user specific solution, others are using alternative open source software solutions that provide a just in time response. This research paper reports on the importance of the engagement of an online community within an open source learning management system, presents the key aspects of communication occurring and romanticizes the notion that a user specific solution is not a necessary consideration.

Citation

Broadley, T., Ledger, S. & Sharplin, E. (2013). Portals and Platforms: Does the technology matter when developing an online community?. In J. Herrington, A. Couros & V. Irvine (Eds.), Proceedings of EdMedia 2013--World Conference on Educational Media and Technology (pp. 1408-1413). Victoria, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 26, 2019 from .

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