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Dual Perspectives on the Contribution of On-Site Facilitators to Teaching Presence in a Blended Learning Environment
ARTICLE

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JDE Volume 25, Number 3, ISSN 0830-0445 Publisher: Athabasca University Press

Abstract

This study examines on-site facilitator practices and activities that support rural high school students taking online courses. We compare online instructors' perspectives of facilitator practices with facilitators' own reports of their practices and activities. A qualitative analysis of end-of-course interview data from instructors and facilitators was undertaken. The resulting codes were mapped onto and used to expand the teaching presence element of the “Community of Inquiry” framework. Online instructors perceived that facilitating discourse was the core activity in which most facilitators engaged, with setting the climate for learning being a primary responsibility of the facilitator. However, facilitators themselves reported that as well as facilitating discourse, they engaged in direct instruction and instructional design. Additional findings, implications, limitations, and research directions are discussed. (Contains 1 table and 1 figure.)

Citation

de la Varre, C., Keane, J. & Irvin, M.J. (2011). Dual Perspectives on the Contribution of On-Site Facilitators to Teaching Presence in a Blended Learning Environment. The Journal of Distance Education / Revue de l'ducation Distance, 25(3),. Athabasca University Press. Retrieved April 26, 2019 from .

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Cited By

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