You are here:

Influence of Motivational Design on Completion Rates in Online Self-Study Pharmacy-Content Courses
ARTICLE

,

Distance Education Volume 31, Number 3, ISSN 0158-7919

Abstract

Student retention rates are a constant concern in higher education, but this concern has become especially challenging as online courses become more common and there are widespread reports of low completion rates for online, self-study courses. We evaluated four self-study online pharmacy courses with a history of very high completion rates for motivational design features, as an explanation for the difference in completion rates between these classes and those reported in the literature. The validated Instructional Materials Motivation Survey [IMMS] (Keller, 1987) and an open-ended survey based on Keller's (1987) ARCS components were used to assess the design and instructional materials of these courses for motivational influence. Specifically, the ARCS components of attention, relevance, confidence, and satisfaction were measured and then compared. Findings suggest that the extent and type of educational scaffolding does impact the motivational effectiveness of self-study, in online pharmacy-content courses. (Contains 9 tables.)

Citation

Pittenger, A. & Doering, A. (2010). Influence of Motivational Design on Completion Rates in Online Self-Study Pharmacy-Content Courses. Distance Education, 31(3), 275-293. Retrieved October 17, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ERIC on April 19, 2013. [Original Record]

ERIC is sponsored by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) of the U.S. Department of Education.

Copyright for this record is held by the content creator. For more details see ERIC's copyright policy.

Keywords

Cited By

View References & Citations Map

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.