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Distributed Cognition and Educational Practice
Article

, University of Crete, Greece

Journal of Interactive Learning Research Volume 13, Number 1, ISSN 1093-023X Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

The objective of this article is to present a brief historical overview of ideas related to the distribution of cognition, offer a critical appraisal, and outline some of the implications for the teaching and learning practice. First, the article provides a description of the mind as disembodied and disembedded, an image that has come to dominate western psychological thought. Second, the article focuses on a set of ideas that challenge this notion of the mind as the locus of all cognition and intelligence: distributed cognition. The main tenets of distributed cognition in two psychological traditions, cognitive science and educational psychology, are presented. Third, the article considers another influential tradition that has significantly influenced the development of conceptions of distributed cognition: cultural-historical psychology. Fourth, distributed cognition ideas in cognitive science and educational psychology are critically appraised, so that similarities and differences are highlighted. The article concludes with a discussion of some of the implications of distributed cognition ideas for the teaching and learning practice.

Citation

Karasavvidis, I. (2002). Distributed Cognition and Educational Practice. Journal of Interactive Learning Research, 13(1), 11-29. Norfolk, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved April 23, 2019 from .

Keywords

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These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.