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Powerful or Pointless?: Faculty versus Student Perceptions of PowerPoint Use in Business Education
ARTICLE

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Business Communication Quarterly Volume 69, Number 4, ISSN 1080-5699

Abstract

The use of PowerPoint (PPT)-based lectures in business classes across universities is ubiquitous yet understudied in empirical pedagogical research. The purpose of this empirical study was to ascertain whether significant differences exist between faculty and student perceptions with regard to PPT's impact on perceived learning, classroom interactions, and student behaviors. The results indicated that (a) students have a significantly less favorable overall view of PPT's influence on cognitive learning and classroom interaction than faculty members; (b) unlike faculty members, students do not believe that posting notes on the Web will decrease their motivation to attend class; and (c) both faculty members and students perceive that PPT has a favorable impact on notetaking quality, content recall during exams, emphasis on key lecture points, and holding student attention during class. The authors offer implications for instructors and future research. (Contains 6 tables.)

Citation

James, K.E., Burke, L.A. & Hutchins, H.M. (2006). Powerful or Pointless?: Faculty versus Student Perceptions of PowerPoint Use in Business Education. Business Communication Quarterly, 69(4), 374-396. Retrieved June 19, 2019 from .

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