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Using a Computer Simulation To Explore Teacher Lesson Planning
PROCEEDINGS

, , , University of Virginia

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, ISBN 978-1-880094-28-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

Computer simulations offer a unique opportunity to research ways to improve teacher education. Over the past fifteen years, Curry Teaching simulations have been used to study preservice teachers’ acquisition of a variety of important professional competencies. Early research focused on fundamental skills such as administering lesson-related feedback and lesson pacing (Strang & Loper, 1985-86). During this period, research addressed teaching domains ranging from preschool (Strang & Meyers, 1987) to elementary education (Strang & Loper, 1983) to special education (Kauffman, J.M., Strang, H.R., & Loper, A.B., 1985). More recent studies have extended Curry simulations’ focus beyond teachers’ use of basic skills to include their more global communication patterns (DeFalco & Strang, 1994) and their sensitivity to individual student learning styles (Strang, Sullivan, & Yeh, 1995). In the most recent research strand, Strang (1996) explored the use of the graphically rich Windows-based Teaching Decisions (TD) simulation to study lesson planning patterns of preservice and inservice teachers. The current study continues research along this strand.

Citation

Sullivan, A.K., Yeh, Y.c. & Strang, H.R. (1998). Using a Computer Simulation To Explore Teacher Lesson Planning. In S. McNeil, J. Price, S. Boger-Mehall, B. Robin & J. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 1998--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 998-1001). Waynesville, NC USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 6, 2021 from .