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Mobile Technologies to Support the Anatomy Lab: An Introduction of the iPad
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, , , , , , , University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-90-7 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

This paper explores the Apple iPad as a potential resource in the anatomy lab. The frequency of web-based computer aided instruction as a supplement to dissections has been shown to have significant correlations with exam grades (McNulty et al., 2004). Thus, determining more effective ways of supplementing dissections with instructional technology is prudent. Further, improvements in multimedia technologies, for which the iPad is an ideal platform, have many implications for the visual, image-based field of anatomy. This study was conducted with first year medical students who had dedicated iPads and shared iPads loaded with multimedia anatomy textbooks and apps for use in the anatomy lab. Though it was found that students made limited use of the shared anatomy iPads this year, addressing the logistics for introducing the iPads into the lab and developing a model of the iPad’s use was a critical step for future research in this area.

Citation

Youm, J., Wiechmann, W., Ypma-Wong, M.F., Clayman, R., Maguire, G., Haigler, H. & Lotfipour, S. (2011). Mobile Technologies to Support the Anatomy Lab: An Introduction of the iPad. In C. Ho & M. Lin (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2011--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 1780-1788). Honolulu, Hawaii, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved February 22, 2019 from .

Keywords

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