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The Impact of Problem Based Learning, Blended-Problem Based Learning, and Traditional Lecture on Student’s Academic Achievement in Education PROCEEDINGS

, , Mississippi State University, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Orlando, Florida, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-83-9 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This paper is a report of the findings for a quasi experimental study conducted on three different groups of students enrolled in an education degree program. Students were taught via three different teaching methodologies. Teaching methods included problem based learning, blended- problem based learning, and traditional face to face methods of instruction. A one way ANOVA was used to compare groups’ academic achievement scores. The findings indicate that there was a statistically significant difference in academic achievement for those who learned via the blended- problem based learning, when compared to those who learned via problem based learning and traditional face to face methods of instruction.

Citation

Derby, C. & Williams, F. (2010). The Impact of Problem Based Learning, Blended-Problem Based Learning, and Traditional Lecture on Student’s Academic Achievement in Education. In J. Sanchez & K. Zhang (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2010--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 50-55). Orlando, Florida, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved August 17, 2018 from .

Keywords

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References

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