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The Design of Scaffolding in Game-based Learning: A Formative Evaluation ARTICLE

, , , Lehigh University, United States

Journal of Interactive Learning Research Volume 23, Number 4, ISSN 1093-023X Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

Instructional games fluctuate between “restricted play” and “free play.” Highly structured games with lots of corrective feedback can be less engaging, whereas unstructured games with minimal feedback can lead to frustration. This mixed methods, formative evaluation study investigated how designers might find the balance between too much and too little learner support in an instructional game’s design prior to actually programming the scaffolding by giving varying types of support to the subgroups outside of the actual program. Four “live” coaches were assigned to sets of learner pairs and played specific scaffolding “roles” based on levels of prescriptiveness and intrusiveness. Learners were asked to think aloud as their voices and screen interactions were video recorded. Findings indicated the students in this study preferred intrusive and prescriptive scaffolding. However, the students’ failure to make content connections indicates the need for more specific scaffolding to support learning acquisition and transfer.

Citation

Weppel, S., Bishop, M. & Munoz-Avila, H. (2012). The Design of Scaffolding in Game-based Learning: A Formative Evaluation. Journal of Interactive Learning Research, 23(4), 361-392. Waynesville, NC: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved August 21, 2018 from .

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