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Culturally Relevant Computing Programs: Two examples to Inform Teacher Professional Development
PROCEEDINGS

, Arizona State University, United States ; , George Mason University, United States ; , , Arizona State University, United States ; , George Mason University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in San Diego, CA, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-78-5 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Children from under-resourced areas are less likely to attend schools with advanced level computer science courses than those in more affluent schools. Girls of color enter technology fields at a lower rate than White females. Perhaps responsively, there is a growing understanding of how to change the tide and level the technological playing field by using culturally relevant computing practices. In this article, we discuss how two National Science Foundation funded technology programs--Game Design through Mentoring and Collaboration (GDTMC) and COMPUGIRLS--implement culturally relevant computing and philosophies through engaging in-service teachers in extensive professional development focused on the use of varied digital media as well as culturally relevant pedagogical practices. Implications for teacher education in general and our programs in particular are considered.

Citation

Scott, K.A., Clark, K., Hayes, E., Mruczek, C. & Sheridan, K. (2010). Culturally Relevant Computing Programs: Two examples to Inform Teacher Professional Development. In D. Gibson & B. Dodge (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2010--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1269-1277). San Diego, CA, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved August 18, 2019 from .

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