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Same-Language-Subtitling and Karaoke: The Use of Subtitled Music as a Reading Activity in a High School Special Education Classroom PROCEEDINGS

, University of Phoenix/ Hawaii D.O.E., United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-64-8 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Abstract: This study examined the potential of incorporating Subtitled Music Video as a repeated reading activity within Special Education English classrooms. The goal of this study was to improve student reading engagement and growth. The basic activity involved students repeatedly viewing a short selection of music video with karaoke-styled subtitles, while completing cloze worksheets. Overall, student attitude, engagement and reading comprehension levels improved during the course of this study. SLS will be demonstrated.

Citation

McCall, W.G. (2008). Same-Language-Subtitling and Karaoke: The Use of Subtitled Music as a Reading Activity in a High School Special Education Classroom. In K. McFerrin, R. Weber, R. Carlsen & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2008--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1190-1195). Las Vegas, Nevada, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 21, 2018 from .

Keywords

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Cited By

  1. Same-Language-Subtitling (SLS): Using Subtitled Music Video for Reading Growth

    Wayne Greg McCall & Carmen Craig, University of Phoenix/ Hawaii D.O.E., United States

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2009 (Jun 22, 2009) pp. 3983–3992

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