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Tech-savvy redlining: Understanding technology's role in educational segregation
PROCEEDING

, Austin Peay State University, United States

SITE Interactive Conference, in Online, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-58-2 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE)

Abstract

Paul Attewell (2001) posed the following question: “Is providing access to computer technology an effective policy instrument for reducing social inequality?” Approximately twenty years later, school stakeholders found themselves at the intersection of nationwide protests regarding Coronavirus, police brutality, and educational initiatives such as Critical Race Theory and remote learning, where longstanding inequalities re-surfaced, becoming more poignant as they bubbled over into schools’ cultures and climates. The technological deficits that persist in non-white communities were on full display, exposing not only a lack of modern technology in these areas but, also, more complex avenues of systemic oppression: tech-savvy redlining, or the systemic and geographical divide of those educators who are technologically savvy and those who are not. Using the results of a study that used statistical geography in the Mid-South and an interactive and colorful PowerPoint presentation, this paper presentation will serve to explore the multifaceted aspects of segregation amongst technologically savvy educators using viewer friendly, geographical mapping, outline its effects on P-12 teachers and students, and offer solutions for bridging the gap in urban and rural communities.

Citation

Parks, J. (2021). Tech-savvy redlining: Understanding technology's role in educational segregation. In E. Langran & D. Rutledge (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE Interactive Conference (pp. 49-52). Online, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 1, 2021 from .