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Designing Effective Instructional Strategies for Online Courses
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, , , Indiana State University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Phoenix, AZ, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-55-6 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

More and more courses in higher education are delivered online. Since the learning context changes from traditional face-to-face instruction, instructional strategies for online courses need to change in order to provide effective instruction for learners. Unfortunately, many online course instructors are not trained to design effective instructional strategies for online courses, and few guidelines are available for them to use. This paper discusses key strategies that can support effective teaching and learning in the online learning environment, and describes how these strategies were employed in an on-line graduate level Instructional Design course.

Citation

Lai, F.Q., Dugas, C. & Hofmeister, D. (2005). Designing Effective Instructional Strategies for Online Courses. In C. Crawford, R. Carlsen, I. Gibson, K. McFerrin, J. Price, R. Weber & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2005--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 2279-2284). Phoenix, AZ, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 23, 2019 from .

Keywords

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References

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