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Avoiding Madness in our Methods: Considerations for Twitter Research in Teacher Education
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, , , Michigan State University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Austin, TX, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-27-8 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Twitter is increasingly recognized as a site for both teacher education and teacher education research. Although using digital methods to study Twitter data has a number of advantages for teacher education scholars, there are also methodological and ethical considerations that they must consider when carrying out this kind of research. Drawing from our own experience carrying out Twitter research, we highlight considerations related to data collection, data analysis, and presentation of findings. These considerations may serve to guide not only other research on teachers’ use of Twitter but also other uses of digital methods in education research.

Citation

Greenhalgh, S.P., Rosenberg, J.M. & Koehler, M.J. (2017). Avoiding Madness in our Methods: Considerations for Twitter Research in Teacher Education. In P. Resta & S. Smith (Eds.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1558-1561). Austin, TX, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 10, 2018 from .

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