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Effect of Makerspace Professional Development Activities on Elementary and Middle School Educator Perceptions of Integrating Technologies with STEM PROCEEDING

, University of North Texas/Birdville ISD, United States ; , NASA, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Austin, TX, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-27-8 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Makerspaces deliver an active learning environment, providing opportunities to assist organizations in efforts to improve teacher attitudes and confidence levels towards STEM and instructional technology. The purpose of this study was to explore how participation in a professional development experience involving Makerspace technology affects participants’ attitudes and confidence level toward STEM and technology integration over the course of a semester. This study investigated professional development provided to teachers within north Texas over the course of a semester. The research employed a constructionist approach delivered via instructional methods incorporating 2D and 3D technologies during STEM instructional activities within a creative space.

Citation

Miller, J. & Cline, T. (2017). Effect of Makerspace Professional Development Activities on Elementary and Middle School Educator Perceptions of Integrating Technologies with STEM. In P. Resta & S. Smith (Eds.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 103-111). Austin, TX, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved August 19, 2018 from .

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