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TEACHING THE USE OF INFORMATION IN A TECHNOLOGY FRAMEWORK
PROCEEDINGS

, , Towson University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, ISBN 978-1-880094-37-2 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This paper is a summary of procedures used to design and implement an
undergraduate course for all entry level students in the College of Education. The
question asked: What do pre-service teachers need most in a teacher education program
that will effectively prepare them to meet the demands of the 21 st Century classroom?
The answer is apparent: effective methods of teaching the use of information using a
technology framework. The answer to this query was the genesis of a course designed
for entry level students in the College of Education that met three unique features: 1)
individual student flexibility in selecting research projects and technology tools; 2)
collaboration among faculty and students in presenting research strategies and
investigating current themes in education; and 3) empowering students with self
management skills that prepare them for lifelong learning. This approach successfully
presented applications of information, utilizing a technology framework. The conclusion
indicates that higher education is improving the learning experience of college students.

Citation

Cheeks, C. & Liu, L. (2000). TEACHING THE USE OF INFORMATION IN A TECHNOLOGY FRAMEWORK. In D. Willis, J. Price & J. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2000--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1265-1269). Chesapeake, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 26, 2019 from .

Keywords

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