You are here:

Promoting Cognitive Presence through Asynchronous Discussions on Learning Design Tasks
PROCEEDINGS

, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece ; , Assistant Professor in Educational Technology and E-learning, School of Pedagogical and Technologica, Greece ; , Lecturer in National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece ; , TEI Stereas Elladas, Greece

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Kona, Hawaii, United States Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

In this paper we investigate how the design and organization of asynchronous discussion tasks may encourage participants’ reflection and cognitive development. The theoretical premises of this research lie on the Community of Inquiry (CoI) framework. In particular instructor’s design choices on the orchestration of discussion forum tasks (teaching presence) propose two forum tasks, the first for students' familiarization with asynchronous discussion processes and the second for designing a technology enhanced course (learning design task). Specific log data from both forums are correlated with data that derive from CoI qualitative content analysis reflecting each student's cognitive development through the learning design task. Results provide evidence about the value of familiarizing students with asynchronous forum processes as well as of participating in learning design tasks organized as a practical inquiry cycle in promoting cognitive development.

Citation

Tzelepi, M., Papanikolaou, K., Roussos, P. & Tsakiri, A. (2015). Promoting Cognitive Presence through Asynchronous Discussions on Learning Design Tasks. In Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 682-688). Kona, Hawaii, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 16, 2018 from .

Keywords

View References & Citations Map

References

  1. Arbaugh, J.B., Cleveland-Innes, M., Diaz, S.R., Garrison, D.R., Ice, P., Richardson, J.C., & Swan, K.P. (2008). Developing a community of inquiry instrument: Testing a measure of the community of inquiry framework using a multi-institutional sample. The Internet and Higher Education, 11(3), 133-136.
  2. Celentin, P. (2007). Online training: Analysis of interaction and knowledge building patterns among foreign language teachers. Journal of Distance Education, 21(3), 39−58.
  3. Garrison, D.R. (2011). E-learning in the 21st century: A framework for research and practice.
  4. Garrison, D.R., Anderson, T., & Archer, W. (2000). Critical inquiry in a text-based environment: Computer conferencing in higher education. The Internet and Higher Education, 2(2 3), 87-105.
  5. Kalantzis, M., & Cope, B. (2012). New learning: Elements of a science of education. Cambridge University Press
  6. Koohang, A., Floyd, K., Smith, T., Skovira, R. (2010). The Hype of using Social Networking as a tool for in elearning, Issues in Information Systems, Vol. XI, No. 2, pp.30-36
  7. Laurillard, D. (2013). Teaching as a design science: Building pedagogical patterns for learning and technology. Routledge.
  8. Meyer, K.A. (2004). Evaluating online discussions: Four different frames of analysis. Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks, 8(2), 101−114.
  9. Murphy, E. (2004). Identifying and measuring ill-structured problem formulation and resolution in online asynchronous discussions. Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology, 30(1).
  10. Papanikolaou, K., Gouli, E., Makri, K. (2014). Designing pre-service teacher training based on a combination of TPACK and Communities of Inquiry. Ιn 5th World Conference on Educational Sciences (WCES), Sapienza, University of Rome, Italy, February 5-8, 2013, Procedia – Social and Behavioral Sciences. Εlsevier
  11. Qian, Q., Hu, J., Jin, R., Pei, J., & Zhu, S. (2014, August). Distance metric learning using dropout: a structured regularization approach. In Proceedings of the 20th ACM SIGKDD international conference on Knowledge discovery and data mining (pp. 323-332). ACM.
  12. Shea, P., & Bidjeramo, T. (2008). Community of inquiry as a theoretical framework to foster “epistemic engagement” and “cognitive presence” in online education. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, New York.
  13. Shea, P., Li, C.S., Swan, K., & Pickett, A. (2005). Developing learning community in online asynchronous college courses: The role of teaching presence. The Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks, 9(4), 59–82.
  14. Swan, K., Garrison, D.R. & Richardson, J.C. (2009). A constructivist approach to online learning: the Community of Inquiry framework. In Payne, C.R. (Ed.) Information Technology and Constructivism in Higher Education: Progressive Learning Frameworks. Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 43-57.
  15. Swan, K., & Shea, P. (2005). Social presence and the development of virtual learning communities. In S. Hiltz& R. Goldman (Eds.), Learning together online: Research on asynchronous learning networks (pp. 239–260). Mahwah,
  16. Vaughan, N., & Garrison, D.R. (2006). How blended learning can support a faculty development community of inquiry. Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks, 10(4), 139-152. Approach, KDD’14, August 24–27, 2014, New York, USA. Acknowledgments.

These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake in the references above, please contact info@learntechlib.org.

Slides