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University Student and Instructor Perspectives on Print and Electronic Learning Resources
PROCEEDINGS

, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Canada ; , Concordia University, Canada

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada ISBN 978-1-939797-16-2 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

This paper focuses on preliminary findings of a survey-based study of students and faculty in a mid-sized Canadian university to assess their perceptions regarding print and electronic learning resources (books/textbooks, magazines, newspapers, academic journals). Findings indicated that, in general, participants tended to associate the term “e-book” with various aspects of electronic/digital technologies, including the nature of the medium (electronic/digital), computer-based devices (Kobo, iPad), file formats (PDF), and the Internet (online availability). Overall, both students and faculty had positive views/perceptions of e-books, and the vast majority of students and all instructors were aware of e-books and had read at least one e-book (or portion thereof). However, only a little more than half of the students and almost two-thirds of faculty had purchased an e-book. Curiously, however, a significantly larger proportion of students than faculty believed that printing imparts greater credibility to a resource’s contents.

Citation

DiGiuseppe, M. & Carliner, S. (2015). University Student and Instructor Perspectives on Print and Electronic Learning Resources. In S. Carliner, C. Fulford & N. Ostashewski (Eds.), Proceedings of EdMedia 2015--World Conference on Educational Media and Technology (pp. 392-400). Montreal, Quebec, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved July 18, 2019 from .

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