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A One-Year Review of the Right to be Forgotten: Implications for Academia
PROCEEDINGS

, George Mason University, United States

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada ISBN 978-1-939797-16-2 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

Twelve months after its announcement by the European Court of Justice, the “right to be forgotten” has come into much sharper definition as “the right to be delisted” after a massive public information campaign by both Google and the European Commission. Issues currently being resolved are the information rights of employers and the public vs. privacy rights and harm to individuals, the willingness of EU nations to share data with the US for international security, the rights of third parties to request delists, the responsibilities of publishers and indexers, and extension of delisting regulations to other social media. Most at issue are the twin questions of who controls access to information and whether restricting access in the EU will result in de facto censorship and inequality with the United States.

Citation

Johnston, J.P. (2015). A One-Year Review of the Right to be Forgotten: Implications for Academia. In S. Carliner, C. Fulford & N. Ostashewski (Eds.), Proceedings of EdMedia 2015--World Conference on Educational Media and Technology (pp. 1002-1009). Montreal, Quebec, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 16, 2019 from .

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