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Methodological issues: Appropriate research methodology for research in the design and usability of educational websites/e-learning environments and related educational technology.
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, University of Tampere, Finland, Finland

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada ISBN 978-1-939797-16-2 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

This paper discusses the research methodology and methods that could be best used in research on design and usability of educational websites, e-learning environments and other related educational technology researches. It focuses on the methodological issues, views and perceptions on design and usability of educational websites, e-learning environments and other related educational technology research area. The paper will discuss the advantages, limitations and disadvantages of the methodology use in a research on design and usability of educational websites, e-learning environments and other related educational technology researches.

Citation

Ogunbase, A. (2015). Methodological issues: Appropriate research methodology for research in the design and usability of educational websites/e-learning environments and related educational technology. In S. Carliner, C. Fulford & N. Ostashewski (Eds.), Proceedings of EdMedia 2015--World Conference on Educational Media and Technology (pp. 710-715). Montreal, Quebec, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 16, 2018 from .

Keywords

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