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Static and Dynamic Design in Online Course Development
PROCEEDINGS

, , University of Nevada, Reno, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Atlanta, GA, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-52-5 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

In this paper, first, we will propose two types of design: Type I design - Static Design, and Type II design - Dynamic Design. Both types of design strategically determine the rules, principles, structures, and macro processes that apply to educational designs such as program design, course design, instructional design, technology integration design, or design of any educational applications. Then, particular examples will be presented in which the two types of design were employed for making decisions on online course development. Designs of course delivery, course structure, information delivery, interactive communication, and course assignment will be introduced. Furthermore, the influence of the two types of designs on students' learning is examined, and the results suggest that an online course that follows Type II design principles positively influence students' perception of learning, motivation to learn, and learning outcomes.

Citation

Liu, L. & Johnson, L. (2004). Static and Dynamic Design in Online Course Development. In R. Ferdig, C. Crawford, R. Carlsen, N. Davis, J. Price, R. Weber & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2004--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 2946-2951). Atlanta, GA, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 23, 2019 from .

Keywords

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