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Addressing the challenges of a bilingually delivered online course: design and development of the Australia China Trade (ACT) MOOC
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, , , Curtin University of Technology, Canada

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Las Vegas, NV, USA ISBN 978-1-939797-05-6 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

This paper describes a design-based research program exploring a MOOC designed for delivery in two languages, English and Chinese. Learning resources, online discussions and activities, and live synchronous sessions with topic experts form the basis of the bilingual delivery. The goal of the MOOC was threefold: to engage leaners in bilateral Australia-China trade discussion activities, develop reusable open learning objects, and to explore bilingual online education delivery. Over the course of the initial iteration of this research, learning technologies, resources, delivery platforms, and communication processes were selected and incorporated into the design. In theory the bilingual delivery of large-scale online education courses can utilize tools that allow for cross-language learner interactions. In practice the development of resources, activities, and shared MOOC learner artifacts present numerous challenges for both synchronous and asynchronous components.

Citation

Ostashewski, N., Thorpe, M. & Gibson, D. (2013). Addressing the challenges of a bilingually delivered online course: design and development of the Australia China Trade (ACT) MOOC. In T. Bastiaens & G. Marks (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2013--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 1284-1289). Las Vegas, NV, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 23, 2019 from .

Keywords

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Cited By

  1. A tale of three MOOCs: Designing for meaningful teacher presence in large-enrolment courses.

    Nathaniel Ostashewski, Athabasca University, Canada

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2015 (Jun 22, 2015) pp. 1279–1284

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