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Using Technology to Reduce Math Anxiety in Preservice Elementary Teachers
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, , King's College, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Nashville, Tennessee, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-44-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics in its 1991 publication Professional Standards for Teaching Mathematics (NCTM, 1991) and the current Mathematics Program Standards for the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE, 1998) stress the importance of the disposition of the classroom teacher towards mathematics. They maintain that if K-12 students are to develop a disposition to do mathematics, it is essential that the teacher communicate a positive attitude towards mathematics. Additionally, teachers need to establish a supportive classroom learning environment that fosters the confidence of students to learn mathematics. Unfortunately, research has reported that many preservice elementary teachers have negative attitudes toward mathematics, are not confident in their own mathematics ability, and claim to have a high level of anxiety towards mathematics (Harper & Daane, 1998; Tooke & Lindstrom, 1998). The Education Division and Mathematics Department of King's College recognize the phobic attitudes towards mathematics displayed by preservice elementary teachers and have collaborated to establish a plan to hopefully reverse this negative disposition. This paper will review current strategies implemented and future techniques planned to overcome the negativity and promote a more positive disposition. During the fall of 2001, we began collecting lesson plans to be placed on the web site we plan to construct next semester. The web site, which will be linked to both the education and math department pages, will feature a number of resources for students in the pre-professional and professional phase of our education curriculum. The web site will also contain tips for dealing with math anxiety, as well as an S.O.S. button (see Rodriguez, et al, 2000) to email the math methods instructor for advice or help. We would also like to include links to tutorials on concepts that our students may need to review prior to being in a classroom setting (see also Taplin & James, 1994). In the spring semester, we plan to use an appropriate mathematics anxiety rating scale as both a pre-test and post-test in the math methods course to determine how the above interventions, in addition to the methods course, have an effect on the students' level of anxiety. The results of that testing will help to determine the course of future interventions. References Harper, W.H. & Daane, C.J. (1998). Causes and reduction of math anxiety in preservice elementary teachers. Action in Teacher Education. Vol. 19, No. 4, pp. 29-38. National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education. (1998) Program for initial preparation of K-4 teachers with an emphasis in mathematics, 5-8 mathematics teachers, 7-12 mathematics teachers. [Online].Available: http://www.ncate.org National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (1991). Professional standards of teaching mathematics. Reston, VA. Taplin, M. & James, J. (1994). Developing a computer assisted mathematics tutorial for preservice teachers: Some pedagogical issues. Technology and Teacher Education Annual, pp. 524-527. Tooke, D. & Lindstrom, L.C. (1998). Effectiveness of a mathematics course in reducing math anxiety of preservice elementary teachers. School Science and Mathematics, Vol. 98, Mar. 1998, pp. 136-139. Rodriquez, B., Perez, M. & Mompo, R. (2000). TUTORPEA for adults' teachers lifelong learning. In D. Willis, B. Robin, S. McNeil, & J. Willis, (Eds.) Technology and Teacher Education Annual, 2000. (pp. 714-718). Charlottesville, VA:Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education.

Citation

Reboli, D. & Holodick, N. (2002). Using Technology to Reduce Math Anxiety in Preservice Elementary Teachers. In D. Willis, J. Price & N. Davis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2002--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1099-1100). Nashville, Tennessee, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 16, 2019 from .

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