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Educational Technology by Design: Results from a Survey Assessing its Effectiveness
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, , Michigan State University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Phoenix, AZ, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-55-6 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

We introduce Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPCK) as a way of representing what teachers need to know about technology, and argue for the role of authentic design-based activities in the development of this knowledge. We report data from a faculty development design seminar in which faculty members worked together with masters students to develop online courses. We developed and administered a survey that assessed the evolution of student- and faculty-participants' learning and perceptions about the learning environment, theoretical and practical knowledge of technology, course content (the design of online courses), group dynamics, and the growth of TPCK. Analyses focused on observed changes between the beginning and end of the semester. Results indicate that learning by design appears to be an effective instructional technique to develop deeper understandings of relationships between content, pedagogy and technology and the contexts in which they function.

Citation

Mishra, P. & Koehler, M. (2005). Educational Technology by Design: Results from a Survey Assessing its Effectiveness. In C. Crawford, R. Carlsen, I. Gibson, K. McFerrin, J. Price, R. Weber & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2005--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1511-1517). Phoenix, AZ, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 17, 2018 from .

Keywords

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Cited By

  1. Unraveling the Mystery of EFL Teachers’ Professional Development in Computer Assisted Language Learning: A Reflective Approach

    Jun-jie Jack Tseng, National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2009 (Mar 02, 2009) pp. 4160–4168

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