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Mistaking the Tool for the Outcome: Using Activity System Theory to understand the Complexity of Teacher Technophobia PROCEEDINGS

, Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Australia ; , University of Southern Queensland (USQ), Australia

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Phoenix, AZ, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-55-6 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

The blame for the reputed failure of schools to embrace information and communication technologies (ICT) and the relegation of new technologies to the periphery of school life is frequently placed directly on the technophobic teacher. In this paper, we question this simplistic and singular placement of blame on such individuals and, in so doing, address the complexity of teacher beliefs and dispositions. In revisiting interview data and mapping against activity system theory, we have discerned a common misconception among technophobic teachers of “othering” technology and believing classroom integration to be concerned with teaching about, rather than with or through, ICT. We cautiously conclude that those perceived as technophobic are in fact mistaking the tool for the outcome and that the problem of teacher technophobia is a misunderstanding of the roles of the components within the activity system.

Citation

Lloyd, M. & Albion, P. (2005). Mistaking the Tool for the Outcome: Using Activity System Theory to understand the Complexity of Teacher Technophobia. In C. Crawford, R. Carlsen, I. Gibson, K. McFerrin, J. Price, R. Weber & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2005--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1480-1487). Phoenix, AZ, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 21, 2018 from .

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Cited By

  1. Altered Geometry: A New Angle on Teacher Technophobia

    Margaret Lloyd, Queensland University of Technology, Australia; Peter Albion, University of Southern Queensland, Australia

    Journal of Technology and Teacher Education Vol. 17, No. 1 (January 2009) pp. 65–84

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