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Transforming Concept-Oriented Course to Case-Based e-Learning PROCEEDINGS

, The University of Georgia, United States ; , Yonsei University College of Dentistry ; , The University of Georgia, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Washington, DC, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-54-9 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

While problem-based learning is known as innovative way for medical education, it requires a dramatic change at a curriculum level and a great deal of resources such as faculty, learning resources, cost, and teaching and learning time. Accordingly, an alternative approach is needed in smoothening this change process. We developed one pedagogically and practically sound approach,. This case-based e-learning environment for Anesthesiology is for a course level of change while holding many benefits of problem-based learning. In a process of designing and developing the case-based e-learning environment, it is crucial to select and design appropriate cases that not only embrace the existing content and instructional objectives but also enhance students' learning experience. In this paper, the process of transforming a traditional lecture-type course into a case-based e-learning environment by focusing on content analysis.

Citation

Kim, H., Kang, J. & Choi, I. (2004). Transforming Concept-Oriented Course to Case-Based e-Learning. In J. Nall & R. Robson (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2004--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 98-103). Washington, DC, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved July 21, 2018 from .

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