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Healing the Universe is an Inside Job: Teachers’ Views on Integrating Technology Article

, University of South Dakota, United States ; , , University of Colorado at Denver, United States

Journal of Technology and Teacher Education Volume 7, Number 3, ISSN 1059-7069 Publisher: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

Teachers, administrators, and parents are finding that using technology requires more than adding Internet access or placing computers in a classroom. Technology affects the way teachers teach, students learn, and administrators operate. Roles and teaching and learning strategies are changing because technology fosters the use of more student-centered learning strategies. How are teachers adapting to this change? What is happening in the classroom? What obstacles are encountered? What do they say is necessary to support the effective use of technology? These and other questions provided the impetus for this qualitative analysis of several practicing teachers who are also graduate students. The dilemma faced by the teachers in this study is how to lead the way in the integration of technology into the curriculum while struggling, themselves, with the challenges posed. Their thoughts, perceptions, beliefs, experiences, knowledge and growth related to resolving this dilemma were categorized by themes and discussed in detail in this paper.

Citation

Norum, K.E., Grabinger, R.S. & Duffield, J.A. (1999). Healing the Universe is an Inside Job: Teachers’ Views on Integrating Technology. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 7(3), 187-203. Charlottesville, VA: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education. Retrieved August 21, 2018 from .

Keywords

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