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Designing Social Networks to Promote Student Motivation and Engagement in Alternative School Environments
PROCEEDINGS

, , University of Minnesota Twin Cities, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-02-5 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

: Recent research showed that students’ awareness, attitudes and understandings are mainly influenced by media coverage (Barraza & Walford, 2002; Jinliang et al., 2004), and more recently, from media and interactions in social networks (Pempek, Yermolayeva, & Calvert, 2009). This study investigated the effects of integrating social networking technologies on students’ interaction and performance in an alternative learning school environment. Twenty-two 10th to 12th graders in an alternative school were recruited from their environmental science class to participate in this study. An online learning environment was designed to assist in-class instruction to promote student learning and engagement around the topic of climate change. Students’ reflections that emerged from their interactions and posts on the social network provided evidence that integrating social networking technologies positively influenced student motivation and engagement.

Citation

Karahan, E. & Roehrig, G. (2013). Designing Social Networks to Promote Student Motivation and Engagement in Alternative School Environments. In R. McBride & M. Searson (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2013--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 4333-4340). New Orleans, Louisiana, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 8, 2019 from .

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