You are here:

A Mobile Augmented Reality Gymkhana For Improving Technological Skills And History Learning: Outcomes And Some Determining Factors PROCEEDINGS

, , Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Industrial School of Engineering (UNED), Spain ; , Center for Virtual Education (CSEV), Spain ; , Center for Virtual Educationl (CSEV), Spain ; , Center for Virtual Education (CSEV), Spain

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Montréal, Quebec, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-98-3 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

EnredaMadrid took place in the city of Madrid at the end of 2011 with the objective of teaching the history of the 17th-century Madrid to participants in the activity. Using mobile devices, participants could learn the history of the city with the help of a mobile application based on geolocalisation and augmented reality (AR). EnredaMadrid was part of a formal higher education environment, where some students could acquire 1 ECTS credit from a National Distance University in Spain. The article describes the educational and technological variables of the experience in detail. It also provides, through the analysis of an opinion survey, some insights on the value of this experience as a valid tool not only to learn history as the main purpose, but also to acquire technological competencies. This conclusion was proven in the satisfaction survey conducted among the participants, as well as the comparative advantages brought about by the use of online platforms and AR systems in the learning process.

Citation

Martín, S., Díaz, G., Cáceres, M., Gago, D. & Gibert, M. (2012). A Mobile Augmented Reality Gymkhana For Improving Technological Skills And History Learning: Outcomes And Some Determining Factors. In T. Bastiaens & G. Marks (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2012--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 1 (pp. 260-265). Montréal, Quebec, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 15, 2018 from .

View References & Citations Map

References

  1. Anderson, T. (2004). Toward a theory of online learning, in T. Anderson& F. Elloumi, Theory and practice of online learning, Athabasca University, Accessed December 2011 from: http://cde.athabascau.ca/online_book/ch2.html.
  2. Azevedo, R. (2005). Computer environments as metacognitive tools for enhancing learning, Educational Psychologist, 40(4), (pp. 193-197)
  3. Booth, M. (1994). Cognition in history: A British perspective, Educational Psychologist, 29(2), (pp. 61 – 69)
  4. Egenfeldt-Nielsen, S. (2005). Beyond edutainment: Exploring the educational potential of computer games. Unpublished dissertation. Copenhagen, Denmark: IT University of Copenhagen. Last accessed December, 2011, from: http://www.itu.dk/people/sen/egenfeldt.pdf.
  5. Spoehr, K.T. & L.W. Spoehr (1994). Learning to think historically, Educational Psychologist, 29(2), (pp. 7177)
  6. Vess, D. (2004). History in the digital age: A study of the impact of interactive resources on student learning, The History Teacher, 37(3). Last accessed July 2012 from http://www.historycooperative.org/journals/ht/37.3/vess.html
  7. Watson W.R., Mong C.J. & C.A. Harris (2011). A case study of the in-class use of a videogame for teaching high school history, Computers& Education 56(2), (pp. 403-417)
  8. Wiersma, A. (2008). A study of the teaching methods of high school history teachers, The Social Studies, 99(3), (pp. 111-116)

These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake in the references above, please contact info@learntechlib.org.