You are here:

Learning Styles and Strategies: Resistant in the E-learning Environment? PROCEEDINGS

, Notre Dame University, Lebanon

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Nashville, Tennessee, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-84-6 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Abstract: In the e-learning environment, are the same learning styles and skills being used by students when compared to students in a traditional, yet learner centered environment? Given the new set-up, skills did not need to be re-conceptualized. It was found that there was resistance to change in the tech-supported environment even though the instructional climate and student role expectation had changed. Students used the skills and learning strategies that enabled them to address context, responsibilities, and learning outcome. Accordingly, in comparing students in an e-course with students enrolled in a learner-centered class setting, the researcher found that students in the online course created new skills, modified traditional ones and/or adopted many of the same strategies when needed. Strategy recommendations are addressed for future e-learning course planning.

Citation

Sabieh, C. (2011). Learning Styles and Strategies: Resistant in the E-learning Environment?. In M. Koehler & P. Mishra (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2011--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 705-711). Nashville, Tennessee, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 15, 2018 from .

Keywords

View References & Citations Map

References

  1. Allport, G.W. (1937). Personality: a psychological perspective. New York: Holt, Rinehart& Winston.
  2. Ausburn, L.J., & Ausburn, F.B. (1978). Cognitive styles: Some information and implications for instructional design. Educational Communication and Technology, 26 (4), 337-354.
  3. Bishop-Clark, C., & Dietz-Uhler, B., & Fisher, A. (2007). The effects of personality type on web-based distance learning. Journal of Educational Technology Systems, 35(4), 491-506.
  4. Brenner, J. (1997). An analysis of students’ cognitive styles in asynchronous distance education courses. Inquiry, 1(1), 37-44.
  5. Chou, P.N. And Chen, W.F. (2008). Exploratory study of the relationship between self-directed learning and academic performance in a web-based learning environment. Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration, 11 (1). Retrieved from http://www.westga.edu/~distance/ojdla/spring111/chou111.html
  6. Cooney, M. & Stephenson, J. (2001). Online learning: it is all about dialogue, involvement, support and control– according to research. In J. Stephenson (Ed.), Teaching& Learning online (37-52). London: Kogan.
  7. Davis, B.G. (1993). Tools for teaching. San Francisco: Jossey Bass Publishers.
  8. Gage, N.L. & D.C. Berliner. (1999). Educational psychology. 6th ed. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.
  9. Ivers, K.S. (2003). A teacher’s guide to using computers in the classroom. London: Libraries Unlimited.-710 DASHDASH
  10. Jenkins, S., Buboltz, W., Wilkinson, L. & Beatty, S. (2001). Matching distance education with cognitive styles in various levels of higher education. In J. Price et al. (Eds.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology& Teacher Education International Conference 2001 (208-212). Chesapeake, VA: AACE.
  11. Liu, Y. & Ginther, D. (1999).Cognitive styles and distance education. Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration, 2 (3). Retrieved from http://www.westga.edu/~distance/ojdla/fall23/liu23.html
  12. Mason, R. (2001). Effective facilitation of online learning: the open university experience. In J. Stephenson (Ed.), Teaching& Learning online (67-75). London: Kogan.
  13. Mayers, T. (2001). Learning technology and learning relationships. In J. Stephenson (Ed.), Teaching& Learning online (16-26). London: Kogan.
  14. McConnell, D. (2000). Implementing computer supported cooperative learning. 2nd ed. London: Kogan.
  15. Messick, S. (1976). Individuality in learning. 1st ed. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.
  16. Omrod, J.E. (2006). Educational psychology: Developing learners. 5th ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.
  17. Palloff, R.M. And Pratt, K. (1999). Building learning communities in cyberspace. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers
  18. Riding, R.J., Glass, A., & Douglas, G. (1993). Individual differences in thinking. Educational Psychology, 13 (4), 267-279.
  19. Shaw, K. (2001). Designing online learning opportunities, orchestrating experiences and managing learning. In J. Stephenson (Ed.), Teaching& Learning online (175-180). London: Kogan.
  20. Smith, P.K. & Simon, T. (1984). Object play, problem solving and creativity in children. In P.K. Smith (Ed.), Play in animals and humans (199-216). Oxford: B. Blackwell, Inc.
  21. Stephenson, J. (2001). Learner-managed learning– an emerging pedagogy for learning online. In J. Stephenson
  22. Tennant, M. (1988). Psychology and adult learning. London: Routledge.-711 DASHDASH

These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake in the references above, please contact info@learntechlib.org.