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Beyond Jeopardy and Lectures: Using Microsoft PowerPoint as a Game Design Tool to Teach Science
ARTICLE

, , , Wayne State University, United States

JCMST Volume 30, Number 3, ISSN 0731-9258 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

To date, research involving homemade PowerPoint games as an instructional tool has not shown statistically significant gains in student performance. This paper examines the results of a study comparing the performance of students in a high school chemistry course who created homemade PowerPoint games as a test review with the students who used a traditional study guide on two separate unit tests. Students scored significantly higher on one of the two unit tests; however, there was no difference in performance between students who created games multiple times. This was the first time a significant difference has been reported when using homemade PowerPoint games. More work is needed to determine which of the three philosophical justifications contributed to this significant result, as previous studies found at least one of these justifications to be lacking in the student.

Keywords: educational gaming, game design, constructionism, homemade PowerPoint games

Citation

Siko, J., Barbour, M. & Toker, S. (2011). Beyond Jeopardy and Lectures: Using Microsoft PowerPoint as a Game Design Tool to Teach Science. Journal of Computers in Mathematics and Science Teaching, 30(3), 303-320. Waynesville, NC USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 8, 2019 from .

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