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Modding the global classroom? Serious video games and teacher reflection ARTICLE

, , Teachers College, Columbia University, United States

CITE Journal Volume 11, Number 1, ISSN 1528-5804 Publisher: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

Video games are increasingly popular with youth though scarcely evident in schools. Serious video games, or those that simulate the real world, motivate players, require decision-making, and encourage student learning about an issue, have the potential to educate students about global issues. Global education, given its heritage as an experiential, contemporary, and issues-centered education, would seem to be an ideal point of entry for such serious video games since their educational aims are one and the same. This study examines teacher reflective experiences with serious video games that have a global orientation. Findings are clustered around data categories, including skepticism about pedagogical value of video games, openness to global learning available through this medium, and tensions between representational complexity and realism. This study contributes to what is known about teacher thinking in relation to the pedagogical use of video games, particularly those focused on global content, and includes implications for teaching and research.

Citation

Gaudelli, W. & Taylor, A. (2011). Modding the global classroom? Serious video games and teacher reflection. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 11(1), 70-91. Waynesville, NC USA: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education. Retrieved September 24, 2018 from .

Keywords

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Cited By

  1. Using Educational Computer Games in the Classroom: Science Teachers’ Experiences, Attitudes, Perceptions, Concerns, and Support Needs

    Yun-Jo An, Linda Haynes, Adriana D’Alba & Frances Chumney, University of West Georgia, United States

    Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education Vol. 16, No. 4 (December 2016) pp. 415–433

  2. Gaming Geography: Using Minecraft to Teach Essential Geographic Skills

    Michael Scarlett, Augustana College, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2015 (Mar 02, 2015) pp. 838–840

  3. Using Minecraft to Encourage Critical Engagement of Geography Concepts

    Jonathan List, The University of Akron, United States; Brent Bryant, Northern Potter School District, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2014 (Mar 17, 2014) pp. 2384–2388

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