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Academic Rigor: Instructor Strategies in the Online Class
PROCEEDINGS

, North Carolina A&T State University, United States ; , Georgia State University, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Vancouver, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-57-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

This discussion is based on a larger report on findings of a study conducted on the relationship between instructor teaching beliefs, perceptions of "best practices" and actual practices in a higher education institution. Following a qualitative study methodology, evidence of instructor beliefs about the importance of upholding academic rigor in the online classroom emerged. Although online education has moved from skepticism to acceptance as more and more prestigious institutions of higher learning have come to embrace it, delivering quality instruction remains a concern for some instructors. The technology-mediated environment challenges instructors to reconsider their teaching strategies and adopt technology tools that promote active learner engagement in knowledge acquisition. Technology may not always deliver the level of academic rigor expected by the instructors. Furthermore, some learners may underestimate the nature of work expected in an online class.

Citation

Nkonge, B. & Kinuthia, W. (2005). Academic Rigor: Instructor Strategies in the Online Class. In G. Richards (Ed.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2005--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 1725-1743). Vancouver, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved July 8, 2020 from .

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