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Re-envisioning the Archaic Higher Education Learning Environment: Implementation Processes for Flipped Classrooms

, University of North Carolina Wilmington, United States ; , Lenoir-Rhyne University, United States

International Journal on E-Learning Volume 17, Number 1, ISSN 1537-2456 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

Flipped classrooms are often utilized in PK-12 classrooms; however, there is also a growing trend of flipped classrooms in higher education. This paper presents the benefits and limitations of implementing flipped classrooms in higher education as well as resources for integrating a flipped classroom design to instruction. The various technology resources will assist higher education instructors in effectively implementing flipped classrooms. The paper also states the need for further empirical evidence to validate the implementation of flipped classrooms in higher education.

Key Words: technology, resources, instruction, courses, training

Citation

Rabidoux, S. & Rottmann, A. (2018). Re-envisioning the Archaic Higher Education Learning Environment: Implementation Processes for Flipped Classrooms. International Journal on E-Learning, 17(1), 85-93. Waynesville, NC USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 14, 2018 from .

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