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Implications for Technology Integration: The Implications of a Local Technology Audit
PROCEEDINGS

, , , The College of William and Mary, United States

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Lugano, Switzerland ISBN 978-1-880094-53-2 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

There seems to be a consensus in the education community that the promise of technology has not been realized. Despite large investments in hardware, software, and infrastructure, technology is not widely integrated. Most use is mechanical and replicates a traditional practice without fundamentally changing the classroom environment. Yet, the promise of technology was that it would help create and support powerful learning environments. Why hasn't this happened? One of the best ways to understand the disconnect between access and use is to look closely at specific cases of seemingly typical school divisions to see how access has influenced integration. For example, the results of a technology audit we conducted at the request of the superintendent of a small suburban school division in eastern Virginia seems to suggest that lack of shared vision and difficulty with access stand in the way of successful integration.

Citation

Hannafin, R., Richardson, K. & Berg, D. (2004). Implications for Technology Integration: The Implications of a Local Technology Audit. In L. Cantoni & C. McLoughlin (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2004--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 3887-3894). Lugano, Switzerland: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 15, 2019 from .

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